Minding our elders


It`s a fact - Our elders are living longer especially so with the advances in medicine and technology. More seniors are leading active, vibrant lifestyles today – long into their golden years – than ever before. However, ageing in the later years of life is not fun for anyone. There comes a time when for example, our ageing parents will lose their sense of independence, their lifestyle, their ability to make decisions, and so much more. No matter what, despite either immense physical challenges or failings of memory, WE – the adult children should work hard to give them credit for, to recognize, and to celebrate the well-lived lives they have led. We salute you our beloved elders.

minding our elders
In Malaysia, AGEING is a serious policy challenge. As a country we should focus on this as there will be new challenges in health services needs and the physical environment. The elderly is a growing concern, and it is important to meet their needs of proper health facilities to live harmoniously. Malaysia is expected to be an ageing nation by 2030 when approximately 15% of the country`s population reaches the age of 60. Whilst we are prepared to face the challenges of an ageing society, we must not forget that the main aim of caring for the elderly is to ensure that they can have a quality life in their twilight years. The problems faced by them are multi-dimensional, from a lack of congenial living space and environment, geriatric healthcare, and rehabilitation services.

minding our elders
Looking after the physical and mental health of the elderly is an area which is critical as the possibility of children abandoning their elderly parents could affect their parents’ emotional wellbeing. This could ultimately cause depression and trigger senility or dementia. With all these issues faced by the elderly community, what can be done to ensure the elderly in our lives age gracefully and even thrive – with dignity and pride? What can children of elderly parents do to ensure their parents enjoy a quality of life they are used as they age? We always pride ourselves on our eastern culture that teaches young people to be courteous and respect the elderly people, but such noble values are diminishing due to various reasons, including the pressures from a higher cost of living.


The most important thing for us to do now would be to practise these values which include respecting and caring for the elderly especially our parents who have sacrificed a lot to raise us. Just remember, older adults do not need to be reminded that they are old. They would like to grow old gracefully ensuring they maintain an active lifestyle for as long as possible.


All is not lost as there are many avenues and initiatives available to the elderly who can be engaged physically and mentally as they age. In the event they are afflicted with an illness that keeps them physically challenged, the availability of mobility aids is within reach for them to lead a near normal life. Knocking on the doors of iElder.asia, a one stop centre which specialises in the distribution of high-quality aged care, healthcare products and services is something worth checking out. They are passionate about providing helpful products for independent living, thus enriching, and creating a better life for the elderly. They provide trusted mobility, bedding, bathroom, and living aids, and more carrying the most popular and trusted brands in aged care living to suit their customer’s needs.


This is the time adult children should focus on “caring for ageing parents” their top priority. Going shopping for the best products in aged and healthcare products to ensure their parents ease into old age in comfort. Taking the necessary steps to ensure their parents are not isolated, lonely, or bored iElder has the latest invention to keep them engaged for hours. A place not to miss.

How do parents want their children to care for them as they age?
Don't take away their autonomy, don`t take away their independence, be there when they need you the most in the years to come.

Article contributed by Mala Patmarajah 


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