Skip to content
*Free Shipping above RM300 for West Malaysia (T&C applies)
Free Shipping above RM300 for West Malaysia
[November 2020 Webinar] Senior Care Education Series- Elderly Dry Eye Care (Presented by Dr Kong Why Hong & Mr Sim Wei Kiat)

[November 2020 Webinar] Senior Care Education Series- Elderly Dry Eye Care (Presented by Dr Kong Why Hong & Mr Sim Wei Kiat)

Dry eye is a common complaint at the optometrist’s office.
Symptoms include dry, itchy, eyes. Causes of dry eye are diverse. Sometimes the root cause is treatable, and sometimes only the symptoms can be managed. However, dry eye syndrome is not new. Neither is Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), an ancient system of healthcare that dates back thousands of years. TCM has techniques for addressing the complete spectrum of human wellness, including dry eye syndrome.

Digital Life style requires our eyes to read. During Pandemic lock down, we stayed home and with more time to read computer and devices, giving our eyes extra 30% burden.


After the lock down, dry eyes, eye pain, eye fatigue and reduced vision becomes secondary Pandemic issues. Surveys show that more patients with Dry Eye Syndrome (DES). To rehydrate the eyes, we are applying artificial eye drops which only gives temporary relief and causes vulnerability to infections and other eye problems.

The perspective of Chinese Medicine of Eye Health is related to the function of our liver, heart, spleen, lung and kidney. Instead of eye drops and surgery, we look further into these organs to see where there is unbalance and disorder and try to regain our vision and repair the dry eyes.


Our eye health is also related to our lifestyle factors: emotions, reading, working, environment, sleeping, nutrition and exercise. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Theory for dry eyes is Traditional Chinese medicine, diet and nutrition, less eye use and more rest.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is based on the flow of energy in the body. This energy, called “chi,” needs to flow uninhibited for good health. The energy flows through “meridians” — invisible energy channels. TCM seeks to balance the meridians using acupuncture and herbs. The most common meridians used in acupuncture are associated with specific organs.
The liver meridian “opens the eyes.” This meridian is the main support for energy and circulation through the eyes. A TCM practitioner can insert tiny acupuncture needles into points on the liver meridian along the feet and hands to unblock the energy flow. Common Liver imbalanced include Liver Yang Rise and Liver Qi Stagnation. Treating the liver meridian can increase natural tear production.


Deficiencies in the Kidney meridian can also cause dry eyes, very common in particular with women over 45 where menopause caused internal dryness. One of the functions of the Kidney (meridian) is the disbursement of water metabolism throughout the body.


Other meridians can also be out of balance that can affect the free flow of the Liver and Kidney meridians, best determined by an acupuncturist doing an intake.

Exercise such as a brisk daily walk is important for all eye conditions and overall health. A Japanese study concluded that an increase in the level of physical activity can be an effective intervention for the prevention of and/or treatment of dry eye disease, as well as helping alleviate other disorders.11
Use a humidifier at home and/or at work to keep the air from drying out in the winter.


Remember to blink, especially while working at the computer. When you work at the computer your blink rate decreases sharply. Researchers have discovered that equally important with blinking is blinking completely. Making sure that when you blink you close the eyelids completely makes a large difference in reducing the symptoms of dry eye and computer eye syndrome.
Check your medications for any side effects that may cause dry eyes. See some drugs that can contribute to dry eyes which include NSAIDS such as ibuprofin, synthetic penicillins, antihistamines, birth control pills, blood pressure medications, and anti-depressants.


Gently massage your upper and lower lids, a couple of times a day to stimulate the tear glands. Better yet, do this while in a warm shower.

Diet & Nutrition
Supplement with research-proven nutrients and eyedrops that have been found to be helpful to manage dry eyes. Important nutrients include omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin D.5,6,7 Researchers have noted that high intakes of omega-3 fatty acids can significantly reduce dry eye syndrome symptoms,1,2 including osmolarity, tear break-up time and inflammation.3,4,10


Dry eye homeopathic eye drops are very effective. We recommend the drops especially formulated for women and for men.
Make sure to eat lots of green leafy vegetables.
Avoid sugar and/or artificial sweeteners: It's thought that excess sugar in the diet results in too much un-utilizable glucose in the eyes (more than half of all diabetics suffer from dry eye syndrome.8 Consumption of more than 11 teaspoons of sugar a day has been linked to dry eye syndrome (a single can of soda contains approximately 9 teaspoons of sugar). Sugar is hidden throughout processed and refined foods including cereals, ketchup, and salad dressings.
Avoid the toxic fats in commercial red meat, dairy products, fried foods, and man-made fats. These fats interfere with the proper metabolism of essential fatty acids in the body and are indirect causes of dry eye syndrome
Probiotics. Gut issues may contribute to dry eye. Try taking a high-quality probiotic to replenish the healthy flora in your gut, particularly if you have been on antibiotics. Gut issues are especially important if inflammation is a contributing factor.9 Leaky gut can be the source of inflammation.
Drink 8-10 glasses of water a day.
Try juicing. Juicing delivers nutrients to your system quickly and effectively. See our juicing/smoothie recipe for dry eyes.
Avoid any foods to which you may be allergic. Try cutting out categories of foods for a week at a time, and see how you feel, or visit an allergist for testing. Typical allergenic foods include nightshades (eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, white potatoes and cucumbers), milk, wheat, and corn (or products with corn in them).
Eyedrops that promise to "get the red out" may reduce circulation in the eye, limit moisture product and may make your dry eyes worse.


Diet & Nutrition
Supplement with research-proven nutrients and eyedrops that have been found to be helpful to manage dry eyes. Important nutrients include omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin D.5,6,7 Researchers have noted that high intakes of omega-3 fatty acids can significantly reduce dry eye syndrome symptoms,1,2 including osmolarity, tear break-up time and inflammation.3,4,10


Dry eye homeopathic eye drops are very effective. We recommend the drops especially formulated for women and for men.


Make sure to eat lots of green leafy vegetables.


Avoid sugar and/or artificial sweeteners: It's thought that excess sugar in the diet results in too much un-utilizable glucose in the eyes (more than half of all diabetics suffer from dry eye syndrome.8 Consumption of more than 11 teaspoons of sugar a day has been linked to dry eye syndrome (a single can of soda contains approximately 9 teaspoons of sugar). Sugar is hidden throughout processed and refined foods including cereals, ketchup, and salad dressings.
Avoid the toxic fats in commercial red meat, dairy products, fried foods, and man-made fats. These fats interfere with the proper metabolism of essential fatty acids in the body and are indirect causes of dry eye syndrome
Probiotics. Gut issues may contribute to dry eye. Try taking a high-quality probiotic to replenish the healthy flora in your gut, particularly if you have been on antibiotics. Gut issues are especially important if inflammation is a contributing factor.9 Leaky gut can be the source of inflammation.
Drink 8-10 glasses of water a day.


Try juicing. Juicing delivers nutrients to your system quickly and effectively. See our juicing/smoothie recipe for dry eyes.
Avoid any foods to which you may be allergic. Try cutting out categories of foods for a week at a time, and see how you feel, or visit an allergist for testing. Typical allergenic foods include nightshades (eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, white potatoes and cucumbers), milk, wheat, and corn (or products with corn in them).


Eyedrops that promise to "get the red out" may reduce circulation in the eye, limit moisture product and may make your dry eyes worse.


Previous article [January 2021 Webinar] Zoom Event: Cognitive Training for Senior & Singapore Nursing Home experience

Leave a comment

* Required fields

Compare products

{"one"=>"Select 2 or 3 items to compare", "other"=>"{{ count }} of 3 items selected"}

Select first item to compare

Select second item to compare

Select third item to compare

Compare

Hi there

Welcome Guest
We typically reply within minutes
James
Hello! James here from Support team,this is sample text. Original text will display as per app dashboard settings